Unclaimed Superannuation

Keeping track of your super

Your super is your savings for retirement. It’s important to be aware how much is being contributed, what super accounts you have and what insurance they provide.

If you’ve ever changed your name, address or job, you may have lost track of some of your super. Having several super accounts could mean that multiple fees and charges are reducing your overall super investment.

Check your super

You can check, consolidate, find lost super and keep track of your super online by creating or logging in to your myGovExternal Link account.

You can also check your super via the ATO app or by calling our self-help phone service, available 24 hours a day on 13 28 65.

Working overseas

If you take up an Australian employer’s offer to temporarily work overseas, your employer must continue to pay super contributions for you in Australia.

Neither you nor your employer will have to pay super (or a super equivalent) in the other country if:

Unclaimed super

Twice a year, you report and pay to us:

  • unclaimed super of members aged 65 years or older, non-member spouses and deceased members
  • unclaimed super of former temporary residents
  • small lost member accounts and insoluble lost member accounts.

We use this information to update the unclaimed super money register (viewable in ATO online services) through which these amounts can be claimed.

For more information on myTax 2019, online tax return 2019, myGov 2019, Tax Return 2019 , or any other tax related matter, please call our professional accountant on 1300 768 284 . For more information please contact us at 1300768284 or you can email us atenquiry@taxrefundonspot.com.au

Check Your Super in ATO

It is important to keep track of your super. If you’ve ever changed your name, address or job, you may have lost track of some of your super. Having several super accounts could mean that fees and charges are reducing your overall super investment. There are a number of ways to check and manage your super.

Use myGov for a full view of your super

You can create a myGov account and link the ATO to:

  • see details of all your super accounts, including any you have lost track of or forgotten about
  • find ATO-held super – if the government, your super fund or your employer can’t find an account to transfer your super to, we hold it on your behalf
  • combine multiple super accounts by transferring your super into your preferred super account; if this is a fund-to-fund transfer it will generally be actioned within three working days.

Conduct a quick search online

You can find out if you have any lost or ATO-held super by doing a quick searchExternal Link

Quick search is also available via the  ATO app which can be downloaded from Google play, Windows phone or the Apple app stores.

You will need to provide:

  • your name
  • date of birth
  • tax file number.

The quick search is a limited search and will only provide details of lost or ATO-held super. For detailed information on all your super accounts you need to register for our online services.

Use our self-help phone service

You can find out if you have any lost or ATO-held super by using our self-help phone service, available 24 hours a day on 13 28 65 Fast Key Code then 2.

We will ask for your:

  • tax file number (TFN)
  • date of birth.

Make sure you have paper and a pen ready to write down the details of any lost or ATO-held super.

The self-help phone service is a limited search and will only provide details of lost or ATO-held super. For detailed information on all your super accounts you need to register for our online services.

For more information on myTax 2019, online tax return 2019, myGov 2019, Tax Return 2019 , or any other tax related matter, please call our professional accountant on 1300 768 284 . For more information please contact us at 1300768284 or you can email us atenquiry@taxrefundonspot.com.au

Spouse Contribution on myTax

Superannuation contributions on behalf of your spouse 2015

Did you make contributions to a complying superannuation fund or a retirement savings account (RSA) on behalf of your spouse (married or de facto) who is earning a low income or not working?

An RSA is a special account offered by banks, building societies, credit unions, life insurance companies and prescribed financial institutions. It is used for retirement savings and is similar to a superannuation fund.

You need to know

You will be entitled to a tax offset of up to $540 per year if:

  • the sum of your spouse’s assessable income, total reportable fringe benefits amounts and reportable employer superannuation contributions was less than $13,800
    • the contributions were not deductible to you
    • the contributions were made to a superannuation fund that was a complying superannuation fund for the income year in which you made the contribution
    • both you and your spouse were Australian residents when the contributions were made, and
    • When making the contributions you and your spouse were not living separately and apart on a permanent basis.

A spouse can be of the same or opposite sex and can include de facto relationships.

If you had more than one spouse during the income year and you satisfy the conditions for the tax offset for more than one spouse, the tax offset is the lesser of the sum of the tax offset entitlements for each spouse, or $540.

 Your spouse’s assessable income is the amount your spouse wrote at

TOTAL INCOME OR LOSS on their tax return, unless:

  • they had a distribution from a partnership or trust
    • they had income or losses from rent or business (including personal services income)
    • they had a capital gain or foreign source income,
    • they made a deposit into a Farm Management Deposit Scheme Account, or
    • They claimed a deductible amount for a foreign pension or annuity at item D11 on their tax return (supplementary section).

Your spouse’s reportable fringe benefits amounts and reportable employer superannuation contributions are shown on their payment summaries.

The tax offset is calculated as 18% of the lesser of:

  • $3,000, reduced by $1 for every $1 that the sum of your spouse’s assessable income, total reportable fringe benefits amounts and reportable employer superannuation contributions for the year was more than $10,800
    • The total of your contributions for your spouse for the year.

The tax offset for eligible spouse contributions cannot be claimed for superannuation contributions that you made to satisfy a family law obligation to split contributions with your spouse.

Completing this item

Step 1

Write the total of your contributions at Contributions paid item T3 on your tax return.

Step 2

If the sum of your spouse’s assessable income, total reportable fringe benefits amounts and reportable employer superannuation contributions was $10,800 or less, use worksheet 1.

If the sum of your spouse’s assessable income, total reportable fringe benefits amounts and reportable employer superannuation contributions was more than $10,800 but less than $13,800, use worksheet 2.

Worksheet 1 
Maximum spouse contributions eligible for the tax offset $3,000 (a)
Amount of contributions paid $ (b)
Write the lesser of (a) or (b). $ (c)
Multiply (c) by 18 and divide by 100.     $ (d)
Worksheet 2 
Maximum spouse contributions eligible for the tax offset $3,000 (a)
The sum of your spouse’s assessable income, total reportable fringe benefits amounts and reportable employer superannuation contributions $ (b)
Base amount $10,800 (c)
Take (c) away from (b). $ (d)
Take (d) away from (a). $ (e)
Amount of contributions paid $ (f)
Write the lesser of (e) or (f). $ (g)
Multiply (g) by 18 and divide by 100. $ (h)

Step 3

The tax offset is the amount shown at (d) on worksheet 1 or (h) on worksheet 2. Write this amount at A item T3. Do not show cents.

If you had more than one spouse during the year, complete steps 1 to 3 for each spouse. Your tax offset is the lesser of:

  • the sum of the tax offset you are entitled to for each spouse, or
  • $540.

Write this amount at A item T3. Do not show cents.

Step 4

Make sure you complete Spouse details – married or de facto on pages 8-9 of your tax return. Include your spouse’s taxable income at O, your spouse’s total reportable fringe benefits amounts at S and your spouse’s reportable employer superannuation contributions at A.

To work out your entitlement to this tax offset you would have used your spouse’s assessable income, reportable fringe benefits amounts and reportable employer superannuation contributions. However, because we use taxable income to calculate many other entitlements, we ask you to record your spouse’s taxable income (not assessable income) at Spouse details – married or de facto.

For more information on myTax 2019, online tax return 2019, myGov 2019, Tax Return 2019 , or any other tax related matter, please call our professional accountant on 1300 768 284 . For more information please contact us at 1300768284 or you can email us atenquiry@taxrefundonspot.com.au

Illegal Super Schemes – Beware of Offers to Withdraw Your Super Early

Have you ever been offered help to withdraw your superannuation early? Generally, you cannot access your super until you retire.

Some people promoting illegal super schemes will tell you that they can help you access your super now to pay off credit card debt, buy a house or car, or go on holiday.

These schemes are illegal. They will cost you a lot more than the super you access and may get you into a lot of trouble.

How illegal super schemes operate

Illegal super schemes usually involve someone offering to help you access your super early.

Promoters of illegal super schemes usually:

Illegal super schemes often target people who are under financial pressure or who do not understand the super laws.

Taking your super out from any super fund early without meeting what is called a ‘condition of release’, or encouraging others to do so, is illegal.

Illegal super schemes may lead to identity theft

If you participate in one of these schemes, you may become a victim of identity theft. Identity theft happens when someone uses your personal details to commit fraud or other crimes.

Once your identity has been stolen and misused, it can take years to fix.

Rollovers to an SMSF

Most illegal super schemes require you to transfer your super from your super fund into an SMSF. This can be called a ‘rollover’.

Printed copies of this information are available from ato.gov.au/publications (/publications)

If you need any more information  to Start Online Income Tax Return, or want to know about myTax 2018, myGov 2018, Tax Return 2018 Please contact our professional and experienced accountants at TAX REFUND ON SPOT on the off chance that you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact our office on 1300 768 284 or email us at enquiry@taxrefundonspot.com.au or Fill your details online at www.taxrefundonspot.com.au

Super Guarantee

As an employer your not-for-profit organization must provide its eligible employees with a:

  • minimum level of super contributions by the quarterly cut-off date
  • choice of super fund.

If you fail to meet these obligations, your organization has to report this to ATO by lodging a Superannuation guarantee charge statement – quarterly (NAT 9599) and pay the super guarantee charge (SGC).

Organizations that are income tax exempt are not exempt from the superannuation guarantee legislation.

The minimum amount of super contributions you must provide for your employees is 9.5% of each employee’s ordinary time earnings.

Any existing super obligations under an industrial award count towards the minimum level of support, as do payments made under a salary sacrifice arrangement. However, employee contributions do not count towards the employer’s obligations.

Employer contributions must be paid at least quarterly to a complying super fund or retirement savings account. The table below shows the quarterly cut-off dates.

For more information on Etax, myTax ATO and online tax return, please contact us at 1300768284 or you can email us at enquiry@taxrefundonspot.com.au